Biogenius wanted, as Sanofi boosts STEM grant for schools

Mississauga’s Sanofi Canada announced plans earlier this week to launch a grant that will spur a commitment to equity for STEM learning programs. The local drug maker said Monday that the new “Biogenius” grant, which will be targeted towards high school students, will bring new opportunities for experiential STEM learning, via a grant targeted to- wards underfunded high school science programs.

In a statement, the company said it believes all students deserve equal opportunities to be innovators, no matter their background, origin, orientation or identity, and that the new grant will be used to help break down barriers to scientific discovery.

“As a society, and especially today, it is imperative to be able to access the full pipeline of diverse talent to foster scientific discovery, and that starts in the classroom. Canadian high schools need more resources to break down barriers, renew scientific equipment and nurture the spark of innovation within each and every student, and Sanofi Canada sees this as vital to the future of our life sciences community,” said Sanofi Canada country lead Marissa Poole.

“The grant will create new opportunities to support access for all high school students to careers in health and life sciences through hands-on STEM learning. By ensuring an inclusive approach, we will help close the gaps that exist and inspire interest in the sciences so that every Canadian student has the opportunity to succeed.” The new program, which formally opened to online applications on Monday, will see four Canadian high schools receive funding in 2021 to help upgrade their science laboratories and launch new hands-on STEM programming in the classroom.

The program is designed for Canadian public high schools offering science courses to students of Grades 9, 10, 11 or 12 (or Secondary 3, 4 and 5 in Quebec) and looking to revitalize science instruction in their school. Applicants must demonstrate what they do to inspire their students to in- novate through hands-on learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), while also sharing strong community support and engagement in their efforts.

Recipients will be selected following a review process, with the final decisions being made by an independent cross Canada panel of experts in STEM instruction and research. Recipients will use the funds to renovate existing laboratory facilities, purchase new science equipment, develop programs that maximize the impact of their lab, or any combination of the above to help pave the way for the next generation of leaders – great thinkers, innovators, and expert researchers who will shape the future of our country. Schools interested in participating can find more information and can complete an online registration form at grant.biogenius.ca; all applications must be submitted no later than 12 a.m. EST on Apr. 1. Participants who wish to register can biogenius.ca. Sanofi, which operates one of its main divisions, Genzyme, on Matheson Road, employs approximately 2,000 people within Canada, and operates four major offices throughout the GTA and surrounding areas. In 2018, the company invested more than $127 million in R&D in Canada.

“As a society, and especially today, it is imperative to be able to access the full pipeline of diverse talent to foster scientific discovery, and that starts in the classroom. Canadian high schools need more resources to break down barriers, renew scientific equipment and nurture the spark of innovation within each and every student, and Sanofi Canada sees this as vital to the future of our life sciences community,” said Sanofi Canada country lead Marissa Poole.

“The grant will create new opportunities to support access for all high school students to careers in health and life sciences through hands-on STEM learning. By ensuring an inclusive approach, we will help close the gaps that exist and inspire interest in the sciences so that every Canadian student has the opportunity to succeed.” The new program, which formally opened to online applications on Monday, will see four Canadian high schools receive funding in 2021 to help upgrade their science laboratories and launch new hands-on STEM programming in the classroom.

The program is designed for Canadian public high schools offering science courses to students of Grades 9, 10, 11 or 12 (or Secondary 3, 4 and 5 in Quebec) and looking to revitalize science instruction in their school. Applicants must demonstrate what they do to inspire their students to in- novate through hands-on learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), while also sharing strong community support and engagement in their efforts.

Recipients will be selected following a review process, with the final decisions being made by an independent cross Canada panel of experts in STEM instruction and research. Recipients will use the funds to renovate existing laboratory facilities, purchase new science equipment, develop programs that maximize the impact of their lab, or any combination of the above to help pave the way for the next generation of leaders – great thinkers, innovators, and expert researchers who will shape the future of our country. Schools interested in participating can find more information and can complete an online registration form at grant.biogenius.ca; all applications must be submitted no later than 12 a.m. EST on Apr. 1. Participants who wish to register can biogenius.ca. Sanofi, which operates one of its main divisions, Genzyme, on Matheson Road, employs approximately 2,000 people within Canada, and operates four major offices throughout the GTA and surrounding areas. In 2018, the company invested more than $127 million in R&D in Canada.

About the author

Asia Metro Editor

Surjit Singh Flora
editor@asiametro.ca

Leave a Comment